Astronomy Sites on the Web: A Sampling for the General Public

Asterices (***) indicate some of the most impressive sites.

Lists of Astronomy Sites

***AstroWeb
http://www.cv.nrao.edu/fits/www/astronomy.html
...a comprehensive list of astronomical sites on the Web, sorted by topics and searchable. Includes observatories, professional journals, amateur organizations, educational resources, pretty images -- you name it! Highly recommended.

Astronomical Images

Educational Links

***Sonoma State University Complilation of Educational Links
http://yorty.sonoma.edu/people/faculty/tenn/Educational.html
...the best set of educational links I've seen, from kindergarden through college.
Royal Greenwich Observatory Leaflet Series
http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/RGO/leaflets/
...short, introductory pages from one of England's national observatories
Radio Astronomy Fundamentals
http://www.nrao.edu/intro/
...a short introduction to radio astronomy, including history, explanation, and images.
Virtual Radio Interferometer
http://wwwnar.atnf.csiro.au/astronomy/vri.html
...a virtual radio interferometer -- see how the VLA works! Brought to us by some enterprising chaps in Australia.

NASA Sites

NASA has some of the nicest sites in the business. Here's a small selection.
NASA Home Page
http://www.nasa.gov/NASA_homepage.html/
***Hubble Space Telescope
http://www.stsci.edu/
...need I say more?
Mars Pathfinder
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/default.html
The Shuttle Home Page
http://shuttle.nasa.gov/index.html/
...look here to find out what's going on up there

Free Programs to Run on Your PC

***Fourmilab
http://www.fourmilab.ch/
...some wonderful freeware from John Walker. Includes homeplanet (a very nice planetarium program for Windows), skyscrsv (a screen saver for Windows), solar (an interactive orrery), yoursky (Web-based planetarium), and more.

Professional Utilities

These sites are the ones I use all the time, and are intended primarily for professional astronomers. On the off chance you wish to dive into the professional literature, these are good places to start -- and all are free and open to the public!
The NASA Extragalactic Database
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/
...type in the name of your favorite galaxy (or its coordinates), and get a list of all the related journal articles, catalog entries, magnitude estimates, etc.; as well as the best available position, and an optical finding chart. NASA does it again!
Astronomical Data Center
http://adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/
...an easy way to access computer-readable versions (often simple text) of an amazing number of astronomical catalogs.
Astrophysics Data System
http://adswww.harvard.edu/
...search the astronomical literature without pawing through all those musty journals. Want to see what that scientist you saw on CNN has been doing? Type in her name and off you go!


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Last modified 03 August 2004

mrupen@nrao.edu